This Week's Selection of Humorous Books

Knock knock.

Opera for People Who Don’t Like It

by Kathy Minicozzi
Opera for People Who Don't Like ItOpera might be one of the greatest of the performing arts, but it is also inherently funny. Who is more qualified to find the humor in opera than someone who has sung it for many years? Kathy Minicozzi strips away the boring, stuffy dignity and false glamour that people have imposed on opera for centuries and, like someone poking innocent fun at a good friend, spews plenty of knee-slapping, eye-watering hilarity. In between the laughs, the author manages to drop real information, not only about opera itself but about the lives of the singers who perform it.

$4.99

Available at:

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Confessions of a Domestic Failure

by Bumni Laditan
Confessions of a Domestic Failure

Every mom knows that if you want to know just how badly you suck at being a mom, take a peek at Pinterest or Facebook or Instagram or anything else you look at a hundred times a week.  It doesn’t take long for Ashley Keller to realize not only is she failing next to the domestic goddesses who post perfect pictures of their perfect motherhood adventures. So of course she jumps at the chance to be part of Motherhood Better boot camp. Now’s her chance to be the mom she always wanted to be – if only that were possible.

$8.99

Available at:

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The Beginning

by H. Claire Taylor
The BeginningThe Jessica Christ series of satiric novels are for people who “like a little blasphemy with your vulgarity.” It’s a new slant on what feminism, patriarchy, politics and religion are – and somehow it all gets addressed in a tiny West Texas Town. This first novel introduces us to Jessica as a young girl, learning to deal with typical young girl dramas: math class, crushes, periods and facing down the devil. It’s all in a day’s work.

$3.99

Available at:

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Party Girls Die in Pearls

by Plum Sykes
Party Girls Die in Pearls

Let’s admit it: the 80s was the best decade EVER! We all looked good, right? Right? (Do I hear crickets?) Well, thankfully Plum Sykes agrees with us and she set this rip-roaring funny mystery smack in the middle of the decade. It’s 1985 at Oxford University. An American exchange student, Nancy, and English native Ursula are intent to solve a mystery and report it in the University’s newspaper. This book will take you for a fun romp among the high society folks of England.

$1.81

Available at:

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Sex Hell

by Joe Canzano
Sex Hell

Yes, we know Valentine’s was last week, but just in case you’re still in the mood for love…here’s Sex Hell!,  or what happens when you’ve got a curse put on you and wind up in a magical place where the sex is great, but nothing else is. It’s an absurd, funny comic fantasy that will leave you wondering if love and sex really need to be connected. Warning: this paranormal love story, as the title suggests, contains profanity between the covers!

$2.99

Available at:

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The Sales Survival Handbook

by Ken Kupchik
Whether or not you’re a salesperson in need of professional help (not that kind of professional help) this is a funny book to read. While we all love to hate a used car salesman, maybe after reading this you’ll find a little empathy. It’s not easy drinking that much coffee!  

$1.58

Available at:

Amazon Icon  audible


Spook Street

by Mick Herrron
Spook Street

With the Olympics in full swing, we thought we’d throw in a little international fun. And what better way to do that than with a paranoid spy? This, the 4th book in the Slough House series, is the winner of the 2017 CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger for Best Thriller. But, more importantly, it answers questions like: where do spies go when they grow old and can’t quite remember what’s supposed to be secret anymore? Is there a senior center just for them?  Seriously, what does one do with a spy who forgets to put his pants on in the morning?

$6.99

Available at:

Amazon Icon  audible


 

Lincoln in the Bardo

by George Saunders
Lincoln in the BardoThis book is so celebrated, we hesitated to put it in the list – really, how much good press can one book get? But, it’s fabulous! It’s also perhaps one of those books that seems least likely to be funny: an historical novel about Abe Lincoln spending time in Bardo (the Tibetan word for “in-between lives,” a kind of purgatory) one night when he visits his son’s body in the crypt. The ghosts/beings there are quarrelsome and insanely funny as they help Lincoln’s son, Willie, transition to whatever is coming next for him. Yes, it’s a book about grief, dying, re-writing history, and truth versus fiction, but it’s somehow funny. Saunders is a master!

$11.99

Available at:

Amazon Icon  audible 


 

Hello Universe

by Erin Entrada Kally
Hello Universe

The American Library Association just announced this book as a winner of the John Newbery Medal for “the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature.” It’s a funny tale about unexpected friendships among two boys and two girls who embark on a neighborhood adventure to put a bully in his place. Although the age range is recommended for children 8 to 12, adults will love this charming novel.

$9.99 (Hardcover)

Available at:

Amazon Icon  audible


 

Frankenstein in Baghdad

by Ahmed Saadawi
Frankenstein in Baghdad

A review in The Guardian calls this recent release an “Absurdist morality fable meets horror fantasy” that is “strange, violent and wickedly funny.” How can you resist that? Saadawi presents us with Hadi, a body-part scavenger intent on making a full corpse out of his findings so that his government can give it a proper burial. Only the corpse goes missing and soon murders in the city start happening, murders done by a “horrendous-looking” killer who cannot be killed. Yes, it’s Frankenstein in Baghdad.

$10.99 (Paperback)

Available at:

Amazon Icon  audible


 

Who’s there?

Convex.

Overflowing books

Humorous books! Get your funny books here! Books! We got humor! Comedy! Satire! Funny books here!

Conspiracy theorists and realists agree: no one knows how many funny books are “out there” for us to read. We tried to count them but we ran out of fingers and toes and the last time we attempted to enlist the aid of others to count, restraining orders were placed against us. (Actually, we’re kind of leaning in with the conspiracy folks – someone somewhere doesn't want us to know the real number of comedy books.)

Undeterred, we became humorous book curators, anyway. And now, each week you'll find 10 -- count 'em 10! -- fabulously funny books ready and waiting for you here. Each has been vetted by our our winning, almost scientifically proven formula to be funny, comedic, droll, humorous (or, if you're British, humourous), sidesplitting, hilarious, or just plain ridiculous.

Convex who?

Convex go to prison.